character recognition using neural networks thesis

1 What’s the Difference Between Defense and Defence? Defense and defence are two alternate spellings of the same word. When to use defense: Defense is the American spelling of a noun that means a resistance against attack or harm.

A good thesis statement might read, "While Tessie is ultimately chosen by fate as 'winner' of the lottery, she sets herself apart as an outsider through her free-spirited nature, the town's responses to her behavior and her ultimate rejection of the lottery's rules. Your essay's introduction should not only present your thesis statement, but also hook readers' interest by summarizing the essay's topic. Illustrate how the traits of the character are relevant to their lives , either by explaining how these characteristics manifest themselves in society or what the story as a whole reveals about human nature.

For an essay on "The Lottery," for instance, you might talk about how Tessie's character embodies people's tendency to victimize and scapegoat someone who is different from them. This would provide a good lead-in for your thesis about how Tessie sets herself apart from the rest of the town even before she becomes the lottery's sacrifice. As you explore each character trait in your thesis, the body paragraphs should elaborate on how these characteristics function in the story.

Your topic sentence should clearly define the trait you'll discuss in that paragraph; in the "Lottery" essay, for example, a paragraph might begin, "From the time she arrives at the lottery, Tessie's free spirit identifies her as an outcast from the town. Use quotations from the story to provide textual evidence for your observations. Ultimately, you should wrap up your character analysis in a way that does more than just reiterate the points you've made in your body paragraphs. The writing center at Tidewater Community College suggests using your conclusion to create unity in your essay by tying it back to the character traits described in your thesis and introduction.

For instance, your essay on "The Lottery" might conclude by revisiting the idea of how groups tend to respond to people who don't share their beliefs, and how Tessie's death reveals the consequences that often come with taking a stand against the majority. Anatomy of the chosen individual allows watching his stages of development. As a result, a student starts to realize the need for self-development and further self-actualization. Also, such analysis allows preventing mistakes of the chosen characters in real life.

This essay requires that a student describes the setting location and time , atmosphere, other characters, and other important details of the plot to get deeper into the nature of the discussed hero. A writer has to dig deeper into all events connected with the described person. The mission is to feel the person in order to forecast and explain his actions.

Point to how the author evolved the hero throughout the story. Were these changes positive or negative? It makes sense to compare different personalities of protagonists and antagonists. Here is how students can do that. Based on the book of your choice, pick a person you like or dislike.

Sometimes, antagonists are much more interesting to discuss as their actions are unpredictable. Also, they have more complex natures and issues. Often, students select characters for their analysis that are somehow assigned to them. While reading or re-reading the book of your preference, take notes and write down the most interesting citations. Make sure to cite them properly using one of the writing styles:.

Develop and organize arguments 5. Write the introduction 6. Write the body paragraphs 7. Write the conclusion. Take a deep breath and start by asking yourself these questions: What struck you?

How to Write a Character Analysis Essay | Pen and the Pad

What confused you? Did you notice any patterns? Did you notice any contradictions or ironies? Frankenstein and his monster alike?

Writing a Character Analysis Essay

Elements of Story These are the whats of the work—what happens, where it happens, and to whom it happens. Plot All of the events and actions of the work. Character The people who act and are acted upon in a literary work.

Unusual Writing Tips: Characterization!

The main character of a work is known as the protagonist. Conflict The central tension in the work. Setting When and where the work takes place. Elements of setting include location, time period, time of day, weather, social atmosphere, and economic conditions. Narrator The person telling the story. The narrator may straightforwardly report what happens, convey the subjective opinions and perceptions of one or more characters, or provide commentary and opinion in his or her own voice. Themes The main ideas or messages of the work—usually abstract ideas about people, society, or life in general.

A work may have many themes, which may be in tension with one another. Elements of Style These are the hows —how the characters speak, how the story is constructed, and how language is used throughout the work. Structure and organization How the parts of the work are assembled. Some novels are narrated in a linear, chronological fashion, while others skip around in time.


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Some plays follow a traditional three-or five-act structure, while others are a series of loosely connected scenes. Some authors deliberately leave gaps in their works, leaving readers to puzzle out the missing information.

8 Ways to Write Better Characters

Point of view The perspective from which a story is told. In first-person point of view , the narrator involves him or herself in the story.


  • How to Write a Character Analysis Essay.
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  • In third-person point of view , the narrator does not participate in the story. Omniscient narrators see and know all: they can witness any event in any time or place and are privy to the inner thoughts and feelings of all characters. Remember that the narrator and the author are not the same thing! Diction Word choice. Whether a character uses dry, clinical language or flowery prose with lots of exclamation points can tell you a lot about his or her attitude and personality.

    Syntax Word order and sentence construction. Ernest Hemingway, for example, is known for writing in very short, straightforward sentences, while James Joyce characteristically wrote in long, incredibly complicated lines. Tone The mood or feeling of the text. Diction and syntax often contribute to the tone of a work.

    A novel written in short, clipped sentences that use small, simple words might feel brusque, cold, or matter-of-fact. Imagery Language that appeals to the senses, representing things that can be seen, smelled, heard, tasted, or touched. Figurative language Language that is not meant to be interpreted literally. A good thesis will be: Arguable. Provable through textual evidence.

    Trace Choose an image—for example, birds, knives, or eyes—and trace that image throughout Macbeth. Debate Is the society depicted in good for its citizens? However long it is, your introduction needs to: Provide any necessary context. Present your thesis. This usually happens at or very near the end of your introduction. Indicate the shape of the essay to come. Your introduction should not: Be vague.

    Open with any grandiose assertions. Wildly praise the work.

    Types of Characterization

    Go off-topic. The organization of this middle section of your essay will largely be determined by the argumentative strategy you use, but no matter how you arrange your thoughts, your body paragraphs need to do the following: Begin with a strong topic sentence. Fully and completely develop a single thought. Use transitions effectively. A good conclusion will: Do more than simply restate the thesis. Synthesize the arguments, not summarize them.

    Move from the specific to the general. Stay relevant.